Poor sanitary conditions can cause disease impacts on public health in Indonesia. Diseases such as diarrhea, typhus, polio, and intestinal worms are a real impact of these diseases caused by poor sanitation. Through this impact, the three village governments in Busung Village, Kuala Sempang, and Pengujan in Bintan District realized the need to increase awareness of the importance of having proper and safe sanitation facilities for their community members.

Water Stewardship Indonesia (WSI), in collaboration with Global Water Partnership Southeast Asia (GWP-SEA), Safe Water Gardens in December 2022 - January 2023 through SWG Program, the 3 Village Governments in Bintan Regency are committed to achieving access to proper and safe sanitation in their areas. On the 19th of January 2023, the activity began with a socialization of the SWG Program, attended by representatives from the Heads of RT, RW, traditional religious leaders, and village volunteers about the importance of access to proper and safe sanitation, how to understand the essential information on WASH access of each household in the village and how the Safe Water Garden (SWG) program can help to improve the WASH access of the community.

The socialization was followed up with e-Survey training for village volunteers who acted as enumerators to obtain initial data on water and sanitation conditions at the household level as a basis for determining the location of the SWG Project pilot.

In this survey activity, in addition to obtaining data related to water and sanitation in the village, the Village Government also receives other positive benefits from this data, mainly as a basis for decision-making in planning and allocating village budget funds for the WASH program, stunting, community welfare improvement, tourism, and so forth.

The SWG program consists of 6 (six) stages:

  1. Socialization on the SWG program and building Village Government Commitment to Achieve Adequate and Safe Sanitation.
  2. Training and survey of WASH Conditions at the household level electronically.
  3. Pilot households identification for project locations. The households are determined based on data analysis from the result of the survey.
  4. On-the-job-training for making proper and safe SWG sanitation facilities. This on-the-job training is an approach used to implement the SWG program to ensure that the pilot village can be the knowledge center of the SWG program that aims to be replicated in other villages in the Bintan district and Indonesia.
  5. Scaling-up SWG Program by the Village Government. Replication of the SWG program will be conducted independently by the Village Government in village areas where sanitation conditions are inadequate and unsafe based on previous survey data.
  6. Monitoring and Evaluation.

The progress of the SWG program is currently at the stage of determining the households of the pilot project in these three villages. Once decided, the “On the Job Training (OJT)” for SWG physical or infrastructure implementation can be started together with the community.

For further information regarding this activity, please contact Fany Wedahuditama: fany@ws-indonesia.org.

Water is essential for human health and wellbeing and in developing and maintaining successful and healthy economies. Failure to manage water resources properly can threaten many aspects of development. Currently, economic losses related to water insecurity are estimated to include US$260 billion per year from inadequate water supply and sanitation, US$120 billion per year from urban property flood damages and US$94 billion per year of water insecurity to irrigators (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (2022)). For this reason, responsible and inclusive stewardship of this critical and finite resource is needed from various parties.

Good water stewardship provides the opportunity to make an impact at catchment or landscape level, and support sustainable production and protection efforts by emphasising and strengthening good water management and governance practices. To bring the action to scale, many obstacles are present. Lack of insights into the financial mechanisms and incentives, fragmented water governance leading to confusion in mapping key stakeholders and limited access to reliable data on water, and a shortfall of enforcement and monitoring are among them. While the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) is seeing a growing uptake of its Standard by business sites, catchment-scale multi-stakeholder collaborations to achieve the five water stewardship outcomes remain limited.

As part of ‘Boosting sustainability practice and performance at the landscape level through good water stewardship’ project, AWS Indonesia, in collaboration with researchers from the Institute for Economic and Social Research of the University of Indonesia (LPEM UI), embarked on a study to explore potential financial incentives and funding mechanisms to support better uptake of good water stewardship in Indonesia.

This study aims to identify the enabling environment and high opportunity mechanisms and incentives for government, financial institutions, companies and smallholders to escalate the uptake of and joint investment in good water stewardship, particularly in Indonesia. The analysis is conducted by defining the existing government and financial sector landscape as well as by looking at some best practices of financing mechanisms and incentives in the region and globally. Through consultation and collaboration with partner organisations and Standard implementers, recommendations are provided to support government and financial institutions in Indonesia to drive good water stewardship practices.

To be able to gain full understanding of good water stewardship, the AWS Standard and the intention and requirements of its indicators, download AWS Standard and Guidance at: https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/ 

Download the summary document and please contact AWS to get access to the full document.  

Contact (Mr) Fany Wedahuditama: fany@ws-indonesia.org for more information and further collaboration.

This document is part of a set of reports resulting from the “Boosting Sustainability Practice and Performance at Landscape Level through good water stewardship” project. This document was developed by Yayasan Aliansi Wali Sumber Daya Indonesia (Yayasan AWS Indonesia) and the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS), in collaboration with the Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Indonesia. This project was possible thanks to a grant from the ISEAL Innovations Fund which is supported by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO

Growing populations and economies, changing lifestyles and global climate change are putting increasing pressure on our water resources. Water-related disaster intensified by climate change can affect artificial and natural environment directly. In addition, water-related disasters also have direct impacts to business continuity of business sectors and economic continuity of a region. Furthermore, through the Covid-19 pandemic, the world has learned that complex, cascading, and systemic risks that are usually implicit in social, economic, and environmental systems can suddenly emerge and threaten humanity beyond boundaries in space and time. As water connects all aspects of human activities at all levels, the intensified water-related disasters in recent decade are one of many implicit signs of how the environment is adapting to human activities. There is an urgent need to address this critical situation.

To do just that, several professionals embarked as members of a multi-stakeholder working group called the Indonesia Water Stewardship Working Group (IWSWG) during the kick-off meeting on March 2021 as part of ‘Boosting sustainability practice and performance at the landscape level through good water stewardship’ project led by Yayasan AWS Indonesia on behalf of the Alliance for Water Stewardship.  This diverse group consists of private sector, environmental standards, conformity assessment bodies, Academia, NGOs, and government / semi-government stakeholders.

From 2021, IWSWG have carried out a series of discussions on contextualizing the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) Standard Guidance to better suit the implementation in Indonesia throughout 2021. And on February 2022, the members convened to explore and determine strategic achievements in implementing water stewardship related to good water use in Indonesia also discussed the current state of water stewardship and important points for the development of a roadmap towards good water stewardship in Indonesia in 2022, which was also mutually agreed upon to change the form of Working Group into Indonesia Water Stewardship Network (IWSN).

This roadmap is developed to provide a pathway for all members of the IWSN to achieve the vision and mission of the network which has been aligned with the vision and mission of AWS Global Strategy. The roadmap acts as work program of IWSN which is set in 3 years timeline.

To be able to gain full understanding of good water stewardship, the AWS Standard and the intention and requirements of its indicators, download AWS Standard and Guidance at: https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/ 

Download the Roadmap and contextualizing of the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) Standard Guidance document.

Contact (Mr) Fany Wedahuditama: fany@ws-indonesia.org for more information and further collaboration.

This roadmap is developed by AWS Indonesia in consultation with all the members of Indonesia Water Stewardship Network (IWSN) as part of a set of reports from the ‘Boosting sustainability practice and performance at landscape level through good water stewardship 2020– 2022’ project. This project was possible thanks to a grant from the ISEAL Innovations Fund which is supported by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO.

Indonesia, although a water-rich country, is experiencing increasing water stress and competition over water, due to rapid economic development, population growth and the impacts of climate change. To address these growing water challenges, there is a need to scale-up action on sustainability at the jurisdictional level (government-defined administrative boundaries). This can lead to private sector actions being better aligned with and embedded within governmental programmes and planning to support sustainability targets at jurisdictional level. Multiple sustainability standard schemes have already started developing and piloting jurisdictional approaches, such as the Roundtable of Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) piloting its Jurisdictional Approach for Certification, the Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH) piloting a market-based approach SourceUp, and Lingkar Temu Kabupaten Lestari (LTKL) implementing the Regional Competitiveness Framework (RCF) in multiple districts in Indonesia.

To address these growing water challenges and the need to embed water better into jurisdictional planning, AWS and LTKL Secretariat collaborated in a two-year project of ‘Boosting sustainability practice and performance at the landscape level through good water stewardship’ developing a strategic document called Strengthening Water Stewardship at the Jurisdictional Level. 

The strategic document sets out to provide:

The findings presented in the report aim to inform LTKL and its district members and open opportunities for a future jurisdictional or landscape strategy by the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS).

This report was developed in close consultation and collaboration with the LTKL secretariat and key members of the Centre of Agriculture Excellence (CoAE) in Musi Banyuasin in South Sumatra (Indonesia). This member district of LTKL was identified as a pilot district for seeking opportunities due to the vast water-related challenges related to peatlands, forest fires and deforestation. To be able to gain full understanding of good water stewardship, the AWS Standard and the intention and requirements of its indicators, download AWS Standard and Guidance at: https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/ 

Download the summary document and please contact AWS to get access to the full document.  

Contact (Mr) Fany Wedahuditama: fany@ws-indonesia.org for more information and further collaboration.

This document is part of a set of reports resulting from the “Boosting Sustainability Practice and Performance at Landscape Level through Good Water Stewardship” project. It was developed by Yayasan Aliansi Wali Sumber Daya Indonesia (Yayasan AWS Indonesia) and the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS), in collaboration with the LTKL Secretariat. This project was possible thanks to a grant from the ISEAL Innovations Fund which is supported by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO.

Palm oil is used in a wide range of products, from food ingredients, soaps and cosmetics to fuel for cars and power plants. Oil palm trees grow in tropical regions, with Malaysia and Indonesia being the largest producers, accounting for 85 per cent of global production. They are grown on both large-scale plantations and small-scale farms, with smallholders accounting for around 40 per cent of global palm oil production. As demand for palm oil grows, so does the awareness about the need to act upon its environmental, social and economic impacts.

Palm oil is a water intensive crop. The productivity of oil palm trees is also highly sensitive to water. Prolonged inundation due to flooding, for example, will affect the quality and quantity of the harvest and can lead to root rot. Water-related risks, such as forest and peatland fires due to slash and burn activities (especially in drier seasons or years), can lead to loss of plantation and other production facilities, while the depletion and pollution of water used at processing plants and refineries can impact production and future growth. At the same time, use of pesticides and fertilisers leads to seepage into ground water aquifers or pollute nearby rivers and streams. Palm oil processing and refining requires large amounts of water and generates waste that could put water resources and the environment at risk if not treated properly.

Sustainable production of palm oil, including water stewardship practices, are already being recognised and implemented via the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). The RSPO aims to transform markets to make sustainable palm oil the norm through a set of environmental and social criteria which companies must comply with to produce Certified Sustainable Palm Oil (CSPO). To ensure the credibility of sustainability claims, all RSPO members that take legal ownership in, produce or handle oil palm products need to be RSPO certified. Improved performance on good water stewardship, as defined by the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS), by the palm sector will support sustainable production, increase the sector’s resilience to water-related risks and increase the sector’s role as a good water steward at the catchment or landscape level.

AWS and RSPO collaborated in a two year project of ‘Boosting sustainability practice and performance at the landscape level through good water stewardship’ developing a strategic document called Pathways towards strengthening good water stewardship in sustainable palm oil production.  The document aims to inform RSPO members on how to strengthen water stewardship practices as part of RSPO Principles and Criteria (RSPO P&C) 2018 and to achieve good water stewardship through the implementation of the International Water Stewardship Standard V2.0, or the AWS Standard. 

As part of the development process, a crosswalk was done between RSPO P&C 2018 and AWS Standard V2.0, which found a total of 48% overlap between RSPO P&C indicators with all AWS Standard indicators. Significant alignments were found with indicators focusing on legal compliance on water, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) provision for on-site workers and best practice related to sustainable management and protection of peatlands and other High Conservation Value (HCV) areas which is related to the AWS-defined Important Water Related Areas (IWRAs). The majority of gaps found from this crosswalk are related to the AWS Standard requirements at catchment level and to best practices contributing to the 5 AWS outcomes. These overlaps and gaps indicate that the actions on water of RSPO P&C implementers could already put them on a pathway to adopting and implementing good water stewardship via the AWS Standard.

Ultimately, the report provides suggestions on how to drive the integration of good water stewardship into sustainable oil palm production at landscape level. This is done through the adoption of the physical scope concept as defined in the AWS Standard to move sustainable action on water to scale. This would inform understanding of the influence and dependence on other water users in the catchment, and support the identification and prioritisation of water risks, shared challenges, and opportunities at and beyond the RSPO certification unit. This can support more informed decision-making in addressing water risks, and support shared value creation in the larger catchment and landscape.

This document was prepared through consultative processes with the RSPO Secretariat. To be able to gain full understanding of good water stewardship, the AWS Standard and the intention and requirements of its indicators, download AWS Standard and Guidance at: https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/ 

Download the summary document and please contact AWS to get access to the full report  

Contact (Mr) Fany Wedahuditama: fany@ws-indonesia.org for more information and further collaboration.

This Pathway report is part of a set of reports resulting from the “Boosting Sustainability Practice and Performance at Landscape Level through good water stewardship” project. This report was developed by Yayasan Aliansi Wali Sumber Daya Indonesia (Yayasan AWS Indonesia) and the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS), in collaboration with the RSPO Secretariat. This project was possible thanks to a grant from the ISEAL Innovations Fund which is supported by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO.

There is an urgent need to include good water stewardship practices in the sustainable production of natural rubber to increase resilience to water-related risks and transform companies into good water stewards. The Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS), defines water stewardship as the use of water that is socially and culturally equitable, environmentally sustainable, and economically beneficial, achieved through a stakeholder-inclusive process that involves site- and catchment-based actions.

Good water stewards understand their own water use, catchment context and shared concerns in terms of water governance, water balance, water quality, Important Water-Related Areas (IWRAs), and safe water, sanitation and hygiene for all (WASH) and then engage in meaningful individual and collective actions that benefit people, the economy and nature. Demonstrating the role of business in responsible water stewardship is an essential way forward, including in the agriculture and natural rubber sector where the supply chain extends globally.

Improved performance on good water stewardship, as defined by the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS), by the natural rubber sector will support sustainable production, increase the sector’s resilience to water-related risks and increase the sector’s role as good water stewards at catchment or landscape level. AWS and Global Platform for Sustainable Natural (GPSNR) Secretariat collaborated in a two-year project of ‘Boosting sustainability practice and performance at the landscape level through good water stewardship’ developing a strategic document called Pathways towards good water stewardship by the natural rubber sector.

This report has been developed by AWS and GPSNR to inform its members on how to strengthen water stewardship practices as part of GPSNR Policy Framework and to achieve good water stewardship leadership through the implementation of the International Water Stewardship Standard V2.0, or the AWS Standard. As an initial step of the process, a crosswalk was done between GPSNR Policy Framework and AWS Standard V2.0. The crosswalk found a total of 39% overlap between GPSNR Policy Components with all AWS Standard indicators. These overlaps indicate that the actions on water of GPSNR members could already put them on a pathway to implementing the AWS Standard.

Based on the crosswalk result, 5 priority topics on water stewardship in the GPSNR Policy Framework are identified:

  1. Strengthen and maintain legal compliance on water
  2. Protection of natural forests and ecosystems
  3. Protection of water quantity and quality
  4. Ensure safe WASH for workers and supporting safe WASH for local communities
  5. Addressing water risks that are embedded in the site’s supply chain

For each of the topics above, the associated guidance for water stewardship actions is provided by the AWS Standard Guidance. This report also provides insights on the benefits for good water stewardship implementation by a natural rubber processor, taking into consideration the recommendations for the 6 topics above.

The document also provides suggestions on how to integrate good water stewardship into sustainable natural rubber production at landscape level. This is done through the adoption of the physical scope concept as defined in the AWS Standard to move sustainable action on water to scale. This can support more informed decision-making in addressing water risks, and support shared value creation in the larger catchment and landscape. The recommendations in this pathways document focuses primarily on categories directly involved in the natural rubber production and processing: growers, and processors.

The report was prepared through consultative processes with GPSNR Secretariat and selected members of GPSNR. The recommendations presented in the report are voluntary and the report is not an AWS Normative Documents. To be able to gain full understanding of good water stewardship, the AWS Standard and the intention and requirements of its indicators, download AWS Standard and Guidance at: https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/ 

Download the summary document and please contact AWS to get access to the full report  

Contact (Mr) Fany Wedahuditama: fany@ws-indonesia.org for more information and further collaboration.

This Pathways report is part of a set of reports resulting from the “Boosting Sustainability Practice and Performance at Landscape Level through Good Water Stewardship” project. It was developed by Yayasan Aliansi Wali Sumber Daya Indonesia (Yayasan AWS Indonesia) and the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS), in collaboration with the GPSNR Secretariat. This project was possible thanks to a grant from the ISEAL Innovations Fund which is supported by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO.

Indonesia Water Coalition (IWC) proudly present the publication of IWC to grow awareness of the need for joint action between major water users, government, and communities at the catchment level. The so-called first movers on water stewardship often have to invest substantial resources and time to implement sustainable water management practices. A prominent example is the collection of access to accurate water data and risk assessment tools at the catchment level, which is often lacking.

The Indonesia Water Coalition, a multi-stakeholder partnership of leading public, private and other actors with the common objective of actively supporting the civil society and government in achieving water security and sustainability of the water resources, acknowledge this ongoing concern and its impact on informed decision-making on business resilience towards climate change and water security. However, IWC members also believe opportunities exist to reduce this risk and create shared benefits for all water users, especially when key stakeholders in the catchment collaborate in meaningful joint action.

The Indonesia Water Coalition members are PT Coca-Cola Indonesia, PT Danone Indonesia, Global Water Partnership Southeast Asia (GWPSEA), PT LÓreal Indonesia, PT Multi Bintang Indonesia, PT Nestle Indonesia, PT Unilever Indonesia, Yayasan Konservasi Alam Nusantara (YKAN), and Yayasan Aliansi Wali Sumber Daya Air Indonesia (AWS Indonesia), have a shared objective to actively work towards water security and sustainable management of water resources through collective action.

The Coalition aims to build a movement led by the private sector, with the capacity and commitment to act on and contribute to the complex water challenges in Java. It aims to create a platform for collaboration and ignite the participation of other water users.

Download Indonesia Water Coalition promotional below.

This promotional publication is supported by Water Stewardship Asia-Pacific and Australian Water Partnership.

On 22 June, Yayasan AWS Indonesia on behalf of the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) and Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber (GPSNR) has successfully held a webinar for GPSNR members to launch the ‘pathways toward good water stewardship in the natural rubber sector’ report. The Pathways report and the webinar addressed the critical topics for good water stewardship uptake in the natural rubber sector, which are: the main drivers for building a strong business case for water, the priority topics on water as part of GPSNR’s Policy Framework and the opportunity to improve performance on water at site and catchment level and make credible claim through AWS Standard certification by the natural rubber sector.

Improved performance on good water stewardship, as defined by the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS by the natural rubber sector would support sustainable production, increase the sector’s resilience to water-related risks and increase the sector’s role as a good water steward at catchment or landscape level.

To respond to the growing water risks in agriculture and work towards stronger actions on water in the natural rubber sector and to build business resilience and improve sustainable production, AWS and the GPSNR Secretariat collaborated in the ISEAL Innovations Fund project ‘Boosting sustainability practice and performance at the landscape level through good water stewardship’ project by developing a strategic document called Pathways towards good water stewardship by the natural rubber sector.

Contact (Mr) Fany Wedahuditama: fany@ws-indonesia.org for more information and further collaboration.

Watch the recording and visual art below.

This webinar is made possible thanks to a grant from the ISEAL Innovations Fund which is supported by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO

Demonstrating the role of businesses in responsible water stewardship is an essential component of the global food and beverages sector as it operates at the centre of the world’s growing water crisis. The recognition that water risks cannot be tackled only at the site level, is growing and the concept of water stewardship is building momentum. Addressing water risks requires working collaboratively with public sector, civil society as well as other private sector organisations working in the same catchment.

Unilever, a leading Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) company with a long-standing commitment towards sustainability issues, water stewardship is about taking action to counteract the impact from their products and operations, and about working with others to achieve sustainability goals. Unilever defined a goal to implement water stewardship programs in 100 of its most water-stressed areas by 2030, including their 6 sites in Cikarang, Indonesia.

PT Unilever Indonesia Tbk, following an AWS Standard pre-assessment of their Cikarang sites by ERM, worked together with Yayasan AWS Indonesia and Royal HaskoningDHV, to develop a water stewardship action plan for these 6 sites. This plan aims to provide Unilever Indonesia with practical pathways towards good water stewardship implementation at site and catchment level.

This project resulted in a set of recommendations for a high-level Good Water Stewardship Action Plan focusing on Unilever’s priority topics on water and addresses strategic risks in the catchment, such as on-site water circularity, strengthening internal governance to maintain compliance on water and supporting the provision of access to safe WASH for workers and local communities.

On 19th of April, the final recommended Action Plan was presented in a workshop in Unilever Indonesia’s Cikarang site and attended by the sites’ manufacturing department and Unilever Indonesia sustainability team. The workshop successfully harnessed positive feedback for the Action Plan, especially capturing Unilever Indonesia’s ambition to show leadership on on-site water efficiency and circularity and towards becoming a responsible water steward at catchment level through its various sustainability programs.

Water stewardship is about taking action to counteract the impact from our products and operations and about collaborations with others to strengthen the whole system. In line with the Unilever Compass’ commitment to protect and regenerate nature, by 2030 we commit to implement water stewardship programs in 100 locations in water-stressed areas where we operate.In Indonesia we will increase our water efficiency and water circularity by reducing losses and increasing re-use of water at site and between sites. We will also ensure policy compliance in own operations, as well as ensuring continuous improvements of our policies and procedures throughout our operations. In addition, our WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) and rainwater harvesting programs are aimed to support health and wellbeing of the people in the surrounding environment. It is important for us to have responsible water management to ensure water sustainability for future generations.

(Nurdiana Darus, Corporate Affairs and Sustainability Director - PT Unilever Indonesia, Tbk)

Adopting water stewardship is a critical step toward bringing Unilever's compass vision to life. Not only helping the environment, but the action also adds value to the people for green future.

(Tyagita Wisnuyadi, Country SHE Manager - PT Unilever Indonesia, Tbk)

We currently see an increased awareness within the industry on sustainability, including water-use, at many places around the world. It is great to see that PT Unilever Indonesia is really stepping up on Water Stewardship in Indonesia. We are looking forward to further supporting them and others in improving water performance to ensure future water availability.

(Martijn Schlepers, Project Manager – Royal HaskoningDHV)

The resulting Action Plan and the workshop has provided useful insights for Unilever Indonesia’s further decision-making for the Cikarang water stewardship program. This includes both site-level actions and more active leadership towards joint action on water security and climate resilience at catchment level as part of the Indonesia Water Coalition.

This activity is supported by Australian Water Partnership.

Driven by the intrinsic principles of the Alliance for Water Stewardship (AWS) Standard to work at catchment scale, and recognising the strengths of Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), Global Platform For Sustainable Natural Rubber (GPSNR) and Lingkar Temu Kabupaten Lestari (LTKL), and bringing together two globally traded commodities in the landscape, palm oil and natural rubber, we work together through Boosting Sustainability Practice and Performance at The Landscape Level Through Good Water Stewardship project focusing on developing practical means to strengthening inclusion and uptake of good water stewardship in guidance documents, tools and performance measurement.

We brought two Spotlight on Indonesia webinar series last year, first on March 30 and 26 October 2021 which attended by AWS and project partners members also leading players in jurisdictional and landscape approaches.

On our first Spotlight on Indonesia: Driving Good Water Stewardship in Landscape & Jurisdictional Approaches in Palm Oil & Natural Rubber, we introduced this project about its main objectives and activities, goals on water stewardship in landscape and jurisdictional approaches and the strategic relevance for AWS members and partners, creating awareness and interest to introduce our focus on water stewardship as part of these. Along with our project partners from GPSNR and LTKL, we presented practical example on guidance development and added value of good water stewardship in the rubber supply chain, and on water stewardship as part of governmental performance measurement.

Our second Spotlight on Indonesia joint webinar: Pathways to Good Water Stewardship in Landscape & Jurisdictional Approaches in Palm Oil & Natural Rubber, together with our project partners, the highlighted areas for mutual strengthening and the potential challenges and opportunities for good water stewardship in the natural rubber and palm oil sector as part of jurisdictional and landscape approaches were presented. GPSNR provided the potential role of AWS Standard in strengthening natural rubber sector performance and reporting on GPSNR Policy Components on water. RSPO highlighted a potential area for mutual strengthening between AWS Standard and RSPO and the current alignment between AWS Standard and LTKL’s Regional Competitiveness Framework (RCF) also with the challenges on data availability and the potential opportunities from good water stewardship implementation in a jurisdictional approach.

These webinars and visual arts was made possible thanks to a grant from the ISEAL Innovations Fund which is supported by the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs SECO

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